Millennials are driving more than in years past.

During the "Battle of the Bike Lanes" last week, City Councilmember Jill Gaebler claimed that it's crucial for Colorado Springs to attract thousands of Millennial workers every year and that these younger workers want more bike amenities. We're skeptical. First, the Springs is having no trouble attracting younger people even without fully connected bike infrastructure, … Continue reading Millennials are driving more than in years past.

“I don’t care if one more 65 or older person moves to this city.”

The Gazette's "Battle of the Bike Lanes" panel last night overall went very well. Seats for perhaps 200-250 people were all filled, with plenty of additional people standing. Overall both the audience and the panelists remained civil, but there was one moment when the audience did jeer a response. As one justification for pushing certain … Continue reading “I don’t care if one more 65 or older person moves to this city.”

More bike infrastructure doesn’t necessarily mean more cyclists.

Many residents pointed out that they don't see many cyclists using the new Cascade bike lanes. The pro-bike lanes side points out (fairly, I think) that it may take a while for more people to realize the bike lanes are there, but eventually people will adjust to it. However: For many months in Colorado Springs the … Continue reading More bike infrastructure doesn’t necessarily mean more cyclists.

Cascade Avenue is even safer than we thought.

In our note “Kathleen Krager: Doubling Down Despite Data” we cited data showing that pedestrian safety issues on Cascade Avenue are exaggerated. Specifically, we said there were 15 pedestrian-vehicle collisions out of 1.6 million pedestrian crossings. We got the 1.6M number as follows: Colorado College (CC) did an analysis showing at least 900 pedestrians cross Cascade Avenue during the … Continue reading Cascade Avenue is even safer than we thought.